GIF the Portrait Tutorial

Miro2

On 10/28 we worked on the GIF the Portrait Project.

Add your written tutorial about the process in the comments section based on the example here.

short-link to this page – http://wp.me/P3Px2D-3V

Many Versions

12 thoughts on “GIF the Portrait Tutorial

    1. Materials:
      8.5”x11” computer paper (5 or more sheets)
      3 artist portraits (for ours we used 3 different gray scale portraits of Picasso) and 3-5 copies of each portrait
      Scissors and/or Xacto knife with cutting mat
      Glue
      Tape
      Some device to take still photographs of completed work

      Process:
      1. Without thinking about composition!…Cut all of the portraits in interesting ways, you should be cutting for at least 30 minutes. You can choose to cut natural shapes that go with the forms of the face and/or to just cut out shapes at random. When I completed ½ hour worth of cutting, I had about 100 pieces in front of me.
      2. Now you may consider composition. You must use all of your pieces to rebuild the portraits in an interesting way. You will use the glue to adhere the pieces to your sheets of computer paper. Your compositions must remain 8.5”x11” in order to translate these to a GIF once completed. (The GIF process will string them together in a short, quick moving animated video)You can choose how to manipulate the face, but you should still have some sort of portrait as your final result. Once you’ve arranged your pieces you.
      3. Create portraits for an hour. If you need more/less time and more/less paper that is up to you. The most images, the more animated your GIF will be.
      4. Once you complete your portraits, tape them to a wall at eye level. Make sure you arrange them in the order you would like your GIF to present the images.
      5. Using your camera, photograph each image individually. Take the photographs from straight on and so that the image fills the entire field of view.
      6. Get images onto computer (you can use whatever methods that work for you- I emailed the photographs to myself and then saved them to my desktop).
      7. Find a GIF animation program- I used a simple, free online GIF animator (click link → https://imgflip.com/images-to-gif ) and upload all of the photographs. Once you do this, all you have to do is hit submit to generate your GIF!
      8. This will bring you to a page that shows your gif and some options to customize including: delay time, pixels (width and height), and quality, options also to add text/crop, title, and tag your GIF. You can adjust these to your liking before hitting the submit button one last time.
      9. You’ve now created a GIF. I just saved the link to my compute so that I can access it at any time.
      10. P.S. As an alternate method for creating your GIF- if you have Photoshop, you can research simple ways to animate your own GIF s using this program.

  1. This work/piece is made of many different images. First, I cut the pictures into fragments and designed a scene. Then, using the VINE App on my iphone, I took a looping video to animate the unglued parts into one scene! (Just touch the screen to activate the camera shots for recording)
    Via this method I can make a different paper scene, and then take more video for another looping series again.
    Repeatedly, I took a video for each second as a different scene, this allows for a you capture several short image based movies.

  2. Here is my GIF. I liked this activity. I do this kind of collage work with my elementary kids. They have a hard time not gluing immediately as well. For my younger kids we look at the book “Windblown” by Edouard Manceau and for the older kids we look at the artwork of Stuart Davis.

    http://makeagif.com/aWsnV9

  3. Here is my GIF. I like to see the photograph with unusual seen. I loved this kind of activity.It opened my imagination to new creative ideas. I think it will help for painting skills, Photography, and graphic design. However, I found different paper scene. I was created randomly, but It made sense by the end. This was making my brain to continue to make more and more paper clips. Then, I am going to see new results.

    http://makeagif.com/2HGFaV

  4. An activity that totally stress released, kind of medicated excises that suit every age level. you start with cutting all of the images without any orders or plans. Then put all the small pieces together onto one paper. you can arrange the pieces in any order you feel like. at the same time, I used the Vine app to record my process. after I glued all the pieces down, I have already made few different interesting looking video. I have totally enjoyed the process of this activity and highly recommended to art lover as a creativity exercises.

  5. 1. First, I took 3 different photos of several artists (for a total of 9 images.)
    2. I cut up each artist’s photo to get different body parts and other parts of the artists. (I cut out the ears, eyes, noses, mouths, hair, parts of clothing, background, heads, hands, and parts of the face.)
    3. I then placed the parts on an 8.5 x 11 inch paper. I then played around with the arrangement, until I made an arrangement that I liked.
    4. I placed a notebook on top of the collage, flipped it around, and I began gluing the backsides. I then attached the bottom-most layers to the 8.5 x 11 paper.
    5. I kept on gluing the layers to the piece, until it matched the arranged collage that I made earlier.
    6. Repeated steps 3-5, until I used up my pieces.
    7. This step happened due to a bad scanner. Normally, I would scan the images to the computer, but due to a malfunctioning scanner, I had to take photos of the images. I then uploaded the images to iPhoto, where I then rotated until they were all in the portrait position.
    8. I used the GIF tutorial (found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ot5GwpQPjF0&index=15&list=PLlJBflOlON5BPe4ibmvgGDb6HyM9NAokx on YouTube) to learn how to do the GIF animation.
    9. I went to Photoshop, opened it up, and went to the Window, and opened up Timeline. (This step is VERY important.)
    10. Go to the small drop-down arrow at the right of “Create Video Timeline” and select “Create Frame Animation,” which you then click. I then unlocked the background to create “Layer 0.”
    11. I then went to “File > Place,” to place the second image that I created on top (make sure you create a new layer first.)
    12. You then go to Timeline, and make a duplicated image. Go back to “Frame,” and turn off the newer image.
    13. You’ll make a third layer, duplicate the frame again, and apply the third image. If it is in the resizing frame, hit “Enter” so it remains the same size.
    14. Go back to the first frame, and turn off the newer image.
    15. You then duplicate the first layer, and then make sure it’s turned off in the first frame.
    16. On the first frame, apply the distortion that you want (I chose “sheer” in Filter.”
    17. The second panel, you turn on your duplicated image, and you apply a different distortion (I chose “Twirl.”)
    18. You then use “Command,” or “Shift,” and select the first two frames, then you click the “Tweening” tool (it looks like a comet in the timeline,) and select the number of frames that you want.
    19. Repeat steps 14-18 for each frame and image that you want to alter. This is trial and error, so Option Command Z is important if you want to undo any mistakes. If a duplicated layer appears on previous images, click the one before the transformation that you’re doing, shift, and click the first frame, and turn off the layer.

    If on “Tweening,” if the bottom layer that you want to see the transformation is turned off, then turn the layer back on for each frame.
    20. Go to File > Save for Web, (save it as a Gif.) For this, I chose the “forever” option under “Looping options.” This allows the image to repeat itself. If you have difficulty saving, save under a smaller size. Be sure to save original file as well. When saving, if you want to loop forever, be sure it’s saved under “forever.”
    Remember; always preview the image before saving. If somehow image doesn’t work, select all frames and save as a 250-width image that loops forever.
    21. You then upload the image online (after dragging the image into a toolbar to make sure that it works.)

  6. Process:
    Cut all of the portraits in various ways, for approximately 30 minutes. (You may choose to cut geometric, organic, biomorphic or random shapes that will correspond with the forms of the chosen portraits.) ***Note: once complete approximately you should have a minimum of 100 cut pieces
    Now you may consider composition. You must use most if not all of your pieces to rebuild the portraits in an interesting ways.
    You will use the glue to adhere the pieces to your sheets of computer paper. Your compositions must remain 8.5”x11” in order to translate these to a GIF once completed.
    Create portraits for an hour or so.( A minimum of at least five.) **Note: The more works created the more enhance your GIF will result.
    Once you’ve completed your portraits, tape them to a wall at eye level. Make sure you arrange them in the order you would like your GIF to be presented.
    Using your camera, photograph each image individually. Take the photographs from straight on and so that the image fills the entire field of view.
    Upload images onto computer, (unless taken from a mobile device)
    Find a GIF animation program- such a vine, or createaGIF.com (The GIF process will string them together in a short, quick moving animated video)
    Once you’ve arranged your pieces you may begin to crop, edit, adjust etc to your liking,
    SAVE!
    You’ve now created a GIF. Save the link to your mobile device or hard drive in order to easily access it.
    Ta-Dahhh!!!!! Pat yourself on the back for a job well done!

    Materials:
    8.5”x11” white paper (5 or more sheets)
    3 portraits and 3-5 copies of each portrait
    Scissors and/or Xacto knife with cutting mat
    Glue
    Tape
    Camera to take still images of completed work
    Vine App, or PhotoShop Etc program to create GIF

  7. My Gif making process.

    Materials needed:

    Pictures of portraits (8.5”x11” – 3 copies of 3 different images)
    Blank sheet of 8.5”x11”
    X-Acto Knife
    Cutting Board
    Digital Camera (Smart Phone) / Usb Connector
    Photoshop

    Step 1
    Take your images (total of 9) and cut them up into pieces with the X-Acto knife. This can become tedious so experiment with the shape and form of your cuts. Keep the cut pieces in one pile.

    Cut the pieces on top of a cutting board so the table is not marked. The back of a note book or cardboard can be a good substitute.

    Step 2
    Prepare your work space. Remove the cutting board. Place the blank sheet of paper in front of you; this will act as your frame and workspace. Spread the pieces around the workspace, this will help when picking pieces.

    Step 3
    Select one or two pieces to place on the blank sheet.

    Step 4
    Take a picture of it. The camera should be parallel to the paper and the picture should fill the frame of the camera.

    Step 5
    Repeat step three and four at least 20 times.

    Step 6
    Create a folder on the desktop of the computer that runs Photoshop. Transfer the images from your phone or camera to the folder.

    Step 7
    Open Photoshop. Go to File > Scripts > Open Stack. A pop up box will appear, click Browse. Another pop up box will appear. Find and select your images, click Open. The second box will disappear, leaving the first box with a list of the selected images. Click OK.

    Step 8
    You will see the images as separate layers. In the lower left hand corner of Photoshop look for Timeline, it will be next to Bridge. Select Timeline, a dropdown will appear. Click the dropdown and select “Create Frame Animation”.

    Note: This is a small dropdown and can be easily missed.

    Select the small dropdown on the lower right hand side of the window. Select “Create New Layer for Each Frame. Nothing will happen. Go back into the pull down and select “Make Frames From Layers.”

    You will see all of the images on the lower ribbon.

    Step 9
    Check the size of the image. Go to File > Image Size. A pop up box will appear. If Necessary, change the resolution to 72dpi and the document size to a couple of inches. Click OK

    Step 10
    Each image in the ribbon will have a dropdown indicating “0 sec”. Highlight all of the images then select the duration from the dropdown.

    Step 11
    Below the ribbon with the images change the dropdown that says “Once” to “Forever.” You can play the sequence by using the controls next to the duration dropdown.

    Step 12
    Once satisfied with the duration and order of the gif go to File > Save for Web. A pop up box will appear. Click Save. A pop up box will appear. Rename the gif and select a destination to save to.

    Step 13
    Test the gif and open it in a web browser. What the magic unfold.

    Step 14
    Share!

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